the north face base camp flip flop Artistry Meets Engineering at Sheridan

the north face mens Artistry Meets Engineering at Sheridan

The (Secret) Path to Success: A Q With Sheridan Alumnus Jeff LemireWorlds Come Together for Sheridan ProfessorPlaying the Hand You DealtSheridan’s Women Share their WisdomCanadian artist Oliver Tiura, AOCA, MFA, SSC, is entering a new dimension in his sculptural pursuits with the help of Sheridan College. He usually works with mediums like bronze castings, encaustics and now with 3D printed resins, which push the boundaries of his artistic field. His interest in marrying sculpture with additive manufacturing (the process of building 3D objects by adding materials layer upon layer) arose from a desire to create legacy pieces. Fortuitously, after deciding to create sculptures using this new medium, he was offered the opportunity of a solo exhibition at the Canadian Sculpture Centre.

“I wanted to ensure my pieces reflect the two main principles of additive manufacturing: reliability and archival, large print size Oliver Tiura

To achieve these works, Tiura began to explore commercial 3D services to see what they had to offer. “I wanted to ensure my pieces reflect the two main principles of additive manufacturing: reliability and archival, large print size,” he says. “Given there’s experimentation in Europe with 3D printing ranging from micro production to that of printing full sized house walls, I knew it is possible to achieve large scale results.” He found that the largest 3D print options here were in the auto and aerospace industries, both of which carried either a prohibitive cost or were unavailable for consumer use. Unwilling to concede, he continued to investigate alternate options.

Tiura explored university and research facilities and found that while many use 3D printers, they tend to be smaller units or units limited to the use of particular materials such as metal. Very few of them were able to achieve prints in bronze, having restricted outputs no larger than 12 inches cubed using either a Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process or an Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process. Neither of which would be optimal for his size needs.
the north face base camp flip flop Artistry Meets Engineering at Sheridan

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